Memoir

The Trump Trolls Came for Me a Year Ago, and I’m Still Reeling

I wrote about how the election impacted me…and got an avalanche of comments about how I'm fat, ugly, a bad mother, and should kill myself.

The Trump Trolls Came for Me a Year Ago, and I’m Still Reeling

“There’s a woman in Montana who says she can’t date anymore because Donald Trump was elected,” Bill O’Reilly began on “The O’Reilly Factor” on December 6, 2016. It was the last segment on his show, called “What the Heck Just Happened?” That woman in Montana was me.

Over a year later, I still hear his voice saying those words, though in my mind his face is contorted into a sneer. At the time, I’d been caught in the cyclone of attention; shielding my face from it swirling around me, waiting for it to blow over. But it went right through me, robbing me of seeing good in people by default. Ripping my confidence away almost entirely as a writer, a woman, a mother. O’Reilly’s words emboldened a hoard of internet trolls to turn their focus on a most vulnerable subject: a single mother, struggling to raise her kids on her own as a freelance writer.

An article I had published in the Washington Post’s Solo-ish section had gone viral the day before. I wrote, basically, that Trump’s election made me want to stop dating, going as far to break up with the man I’d been dating for a month or so. I said I felt hopeless, not only in the new political climate, but with believing a new person I’d brought into our lives would eventually love me and my two young daughters. I just didn’t care anymore. After the election, I didn’t have the will or even energy to put into a new relationship. I needed to regroup, pulling the focus back to my children and close friends instead of looking outward to bring someone new into the fold. It was my attempt to process a great loss at the possibility of a first woman president, then seeing a man who boasted about sexual assault be appointed instead. It was channeling my inner strength as a single mother to carry my girls through difficult times.

Thousands – it’s safe to say hundreds of thousands – thought this viewpoint wasn’t only ridiculous, but reason to send me messages saying as much. What began as several angry tweets grew with intensity to the point where Fox News’s blurb about my article was trending and at the top of their list by the next morning. Conservative news personalities, like Joe Walsh, tweeted about not just my article, but me personally. My website’s activity reached alarming levels. Hate-filled tweets started to come at me in a steady stream. The subjects of most of the tweets fit into three categories: my physical appearance, my failure as a mother, and my poor mental health. I never expected my article to get the reaction it did, or those comments would hammer into me until they broke through, and became part of my inner core of beliefs.

As a freelance writer whose main topics are social and economic justice, this was not my first experience with vitriol from people who’d only read a headline. At first, I thought the comments were almost funny – like men who tweeted at me that I’d failed as a mother because I didn’t stay with my kids’ dad. “Which one?” I almost replied. By late afternoon the volume had doubled, with several men tweeting at me without any sign of letting up. Women left long comments about what a disaster I was as a mother and human being on my public Facebook page where I’d posted a link to the article. I started getting emails through the contact form on my website, calling me mentally deranged, nutjob, crazy woman, and, of course, a cunt. My writer friends told me getting under readers’ skin like that was a good thing, but I could feel my anxiety rising. This wasn’t normal. Then, one of the Twitter trolls announced Bill O’Reilly had decided to talk about me on his show.

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My friend Lindsey rushed over to watch the segment with me, because Lindsey was one of those friends who drops everything to bring you soup or support when you really need it. A troll tweeted a link to the segment that was almost immediately posted on YouTube. It featured Lisa Kennedy Montgomery, who has gone by Kennedy since she was an MTV VJ in my youth who I had considered the epitome of cool. O’Reilly started by summarizing my article in just that one line about the woman in Montana, then asked his guests, Kennedy and a man I didn’t recognize, for their take. It seemed clear they hadn’t read it closely, and didn’t want to discuss what the article was really about, so the conversation quickly turned into their opinions of me.

“She’s in desperate need of mental health care,” Kennedy said to start off. I frowned at the screen. Had they only read commentary on my article? They didn’t read from it, or use any direct quotes. They focused on a perceived weakness in my expressing sadness over Trump being elected. My confusion grew over why this was a big deal to them, and why it was so horrible for me to admit feeling a great loss of hope. I thought of how many other people had shared the same thoughts with me since the night of the election.

“The woman just can’t interact with anybody,” O’Reilly said with a shrug. After the segment ended, my friend and I stood in silence for a minute.

“Kennedy,” my friend said, “what have you done?!” We both cracked up laughing, but I was scared to look at my phone. My essay had already been trending on Fox News sites for two days. Now, every time I checked, the little red number next to the Facebook and Twitter apps showed 20+. Every time, whether it’d been ten minutes or two.

It went on like this for days. People wrote about my essay in places as high up as the Wall Street Journal. Through Google Alerts, I saw threads on Reddit about my physical appearance. They had long discussions claiming that no one would want to fuck me anyway. Some people made YouTube videos practically yelling in anger over the audacity of my expectation that a man would raise another man’s children. At home, with those children, I did my best to be present with them. Coraline, my youngest, had recently come down with a bout of Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease, covered in spots, her misery and the comments making me feel like a failure of a mother. I couldn’t even protect them from illness, my irrational, torn-down, sleep-deprived mind started to say.

After days of hundreds of trolls flinging the worst of their shit at me, I stopped dodging. I got tired. I just let them hit me.

I started looking at my reflection more critically, looking for the ugliness they saw that I didn’t. Then I couldn’t really look in the mirror anymore. I only saw their words. My skin seemed saggy, my nose bigger, my arms flabby. Had I just gained ten pounds? It definitely looked like I had gained ten pounds. Every imperfection started to highlight itself in a way that it was all I saw. Instead of flexing in front of the mirror, I started sucking in my gut, and wore nothing but baggy clothes.

Then a handful of trolls decided I should kill myself, and the idea seemed to catch on. One guy kept repeating his comment on my public Facebook page about specific ways I could do it, even linking a book from Amazon to help me. His messages repeated themselves in a sinister way; an evil-minded suggestion presented in a friendly manner. Someone created a thread about me on 4chan, where they posted pictures of my kids. Many, because of my oldest daughter’s dark complexion, assumed she was mixed race, which brought out the worst words I have ever seen in writing.

I couldn’t sit in this alone anymore. I asked for help. At a friend’s suggestion, I posted about my struggle in the Facebook group Pantsuit Nation, and it drew almost 40,000 comments of love and hundreds of messages. Friends started fighting back in comment sections and on Twitter. People started using the tag #StephanieArmy and acted accordingly. Seeing them supporting and fighting for me helped me feel less like a person in the middle of a field with any object people could find thrown her way. One friend took over administrating my public page, removing threatening comments. Others fought back, so much that the trolls started to slink away, outnumbered.

Ironically, not even a month after the article about not wanting to date went viral, I found myself falling madly in love with a friend of mine. One who knew me and what falling in love with me meant. What his role would be in not only my life, but my girls’ lives, too. Matt, even though he’d never had a desire to have children, instinctively knew how to be not only a partner, but a parent. I’d run to the store and come home to find the girls coloring and him cleaning the kitchen. He made dinners they actually ate. When we all piled in the car to go somewhere for the day, I’d often turn to run back inside for something I’d forgotten only to hear him say that he’d already packed it in the snack bag.

We married after a few months, annoying ourselves in our attempts to explain it by saying “when you know, you know.” He took my last name to match the little girls he openly calls his daughters. He’s adopting Coraline, who he affectionately calls “Tiny,” and we’ve successfully transitioned to him being a full-time, stay-at-home Dad. As I write this in the office in our new house, he’s whistling in the garage in between using a power drill.

But my sensitivity about perceived judgements and opinions on my physical appearance hasn’t waned. I force myself to exercise, even though my schedule often doesn’t afford me the time. I lost about twenty pounds in six months after the article went viral. I openly admit that while the exercise does wonderful things for me mentally and physically, my main motivation is vanity, or more pointedly, a fear of looking like the way trolls described.

I wish I could say that absolutely no real harm came from this experience. That even though the trolls stayed for almost two weeks, they didn’t affect me or my family in the long run. But that’s not true. I remain acutely aware of my body’s fluctuations in weight, critically pinching my stomach and love handles whenever they start to expand. Previously, as a 38-year-old mother of two, I accepted my body’s changes over time and seasons. But now I wrinkle my nose at dimples and sagging skin. Sometimes, I wince at my reflection, and especially photographs.

A few weeks ago, my husband sent me a text from the other side of a little antique store we’d decided to stop in on a Saturday afternoon. I’d wandered to the other side of the store, looking at old photographs while he stayed with the girls as they looked through toys. You’re so fucking hot, his text read. I smiled at it, stood up a little straighter, and remembered not to default to feeling the opposite.

I’ve tried to talk to him about this. “They’re just horrible people with internet access,” he’ll say.

“But it’s the quantity,” I tell him. The waves of them that nearly drowned me. The rants by people on other websites, the videos they made to make fun of me, then all the comments from those. “It’s a countless amount of people and comments discussing how ugly I am. So, in my mind, since there’s so many, it must be true.”

More than anything I’ve felt a lasting disappointment. It’s one thing to know that sort of ugliness exists in human beings; that we’re all fully capable of it and some choose to act in order to tear others down. To have a whole crowd of them turn on you personally, feeling the massive amounts of energy they put into making you feel like shit, changes the way you look at gatherings of strangers even in the small town you’ve lived in for over five years. Even where you’ve been raising your children, walking your dog, waving to drivers approaching as you pass each other on backroads. Missoula isn’t as conservative as the rest of Montana, but every truck with a bumper sticker to support Trump now contains a driver who could have told me I should give my kids up for adoption and die. While the reasonable part of me knows that’s probably not the case, its possibility is enough for me to lose my faith in believing that people are good at heart.

I tried to protect us from future attacks, even when that meant putting my freelancing career on hold. I took measures to prevent myself from being doxxed in the future, but it took a long time before I was comfortable publishing anything on the Internet. After six months of not submitting anything to editors, I sent an essay to my editor at Solo-ish again. But this time it was to celebrate finding a husband who had stepped up to share the mental and physical load involved in raising children. On the day it was posted online, it went almost completely unnoticed. And that was okay.

On the day news broke about O’Reilly’s sexual harassments and assaults leading to him being fired, I received several messages from friends who wanted to celebrate with me. I kept thinking about him saying I couldn’t interact with anybody. I wondered if he’d been projecting.